Donate Today OR
Humane Society of Greater Dayton
Mar 7

Make a Pet Feel Lucky, Adopt

DogInGrassWho needs a four-leaf clover or some leprechauns to feel lucky? You know what can make this St. Patrick’s Day lucky for you and for a pet in need? Choose to adopt! Adding a new pet to your household can be an exciting and life-changing time for your family. With many avenues out there for finding pets, adopting a one-of-a-kind pet from your area animal shelter should be at the top of your list. Here are just a few reasons why you should adopt a shelter pet.

Read more
Feb 6

Host Super Bowl Parties without Stressing Pets

DogLayingOnFloorYou’ve cooked up your chicken wings, invited over your friends and are ready to cheer on your team for Super Bowl Sunday. Whether you’re rooting for the Seahawks, the Patriots or just watching the commercials or halftime show, remember to be considerate of your pets.

The increase in noise and added people in your home can cause unneeded stress to your animals. Before your friends come over, follow these tips to keep your furry friends safe for Super Bowl Sunday.

 

Keep Them Separated

Pets like to have a safe haven to go to when the noise becomes too much. Before your event, create a quiet area for your pets that will help keep them calm. Make sure the room has everything they will need including food, water, bedding and your pet’s favorite toys. Turn on some calming music or the television to help your pets tune out some of the loud noises from your party.

 

Watch the Beverages

Caffeinated drinks such as cola can cause issues for your pet. This can include restlessness, muscle tremors, breathing issues and heart palpitations. In addition, avoid letting your pets consume any sort of alcohol. Beer, liquor and wine can have damaging effects on your pet’s liver and brain. In fact, just two teaspoons of whiskey can cause a 5-pound cat to go into a coma. Just one additional teaspoon could be deadly for your cat.

 

Avoid the Guacamole

Guacamole and tortilla chips are the staple to many Super Bowl parties. Even though you and your guests can enjoy this delicious snack, there are three things in guacamole that can be harmful to your pets. Avocados, garlic and onions can be harmful when consumed by animals. Garlic and onions can damage your pet’s red blood cells and also cause gastrointestinal irritation. The leaves, fruit and seeds of avocados contain Persin, which can cause your pets to have severe diarrhea or vomiting. It can make breathing difficult and fluid can collect around their heart if consumed.

 

Say No to Chicken Wings

Chicken wings can be extremely harmful to your pets. Avoid the temptation to give your pets scraps. Smaller bones found in chicken, as well as other birds, can easily be consumed by your pet. This can lead to possible choking hazards. If a bone splinters or splits, this can also cause tearing in your pet’s gastrointestinal tract. In addition to these risks, the increase in salt can also be damaging to your pet. Signs your pet has consumed too much salt include diarrhea, vomiting, tremors, and elevated body temperature or seizures.

 

ID Your Pets

With more people coming and going from your home, it will be easier for your pets to slip out the door. Make sure your pet has their tags and collar on before your party. In addition, it is important to get your pets microchpped. For just $10, you can bring your pet to the Humane Society of Greater Dayton and we will microchip your pets for you. No appointments are needed and the whole process takes less than 10 minutes to do.

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 114 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937-268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org.

Jan 10

Avoid the Cold and Keep Pets Active Indoors

dog-puzzleAs the snow has fallen and temperatures have dropped the thought of taking Fido outside to play seems less and less appealing. For you and your pet’s safety, it may be better to find some activities you can do indoors that will still help to stimulate your pet’s mind. Here are just a few things you may want to try.

Time to Train

Spending a little time indoors is the perfect opportunity to work on your pet’s training. Whether you are trying to teach your pet to walk up and down stairs or focusing on basic commands such as sit or stay, this may be a great way for the two of you to get in some good training. Do you have a treadmill in your home? You can also work on training your dog to walk on the treadmill. This will offer a great exercise outlet for your pet on days when the weather is less than ideal for walking outside.

Solve the Puzzle

Rather than just throwing your pet’s food into a regular dog dish, why not try to feed them using a feeder puzzle? These puzzles are great. They help stimulate your pet’s mind and also help to slow down their eating. We actually use this method within our shelter to keep our dogs focused and entertained. There are many types of puzzles out there and you will have to just test to see what one works best for you and your pet. Don’t want to mess with puzzles? You can still make feeding time a little more challenging. Hide your pet’s food in a different part of the house and help them search and find it. If that is too challenging you can leave a little trail of food leading to the main dish, but it will at least keep them on their toes.

Play Ball

Do you have a nice long hallway? Why not toss a ball to your pet? Playing fetch with your pet will help them burn off a bit of energy and will also be a fun activity for you and your pet. I would recommend using a ball that doesn’t have too much bounce. You don’t want it bouncing off your walls and potentially knocking down pictures or other decorations on your walls.

Get Agile

Grab some chairs, pillows, boxes or other household items and create a mini agility course for your pet. Walk them through it using a lead and as you go through it a few times start picking up the pace. Not only will you give your pet a good workout, by making them focus on your commands and the course in front of them will keep them stimulated mentally, too.  

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded in 1902, it is the largest and most established “no-kill” animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937-268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Oct 2

Prevent Separation Anxiety While You're Away

DogSeparationAnxietyThe whimpers and barks you hear as you lock the door, the sad puppy dog eyes looking at you through the window – leaving your dog at home can be difficult for not just your pet but you too.

However, separation anxiety, also called SA, is a very common issue many puppies and pet owners deal with on a regular basis. Whether your dog chooses to bark continuously, chew up furniture or use the restroom on the floor, there are ways to train them to not fear being alone in your home. Here are just a few ways to ease the pain when you have to leave your pet alone.

Train Your Pet to Feel Comfortable in a Crate

Open up your dog’s crate and play games where you throw treats in and out of the crate. Repeat this exercise several times each day and gradually close the door of the crate with your puppy inside for increments of time. Start slow but the longer you do this, the longer increment of time you keep your puppy in his or her crate. Also, when your dog is napping place him in his crate. You are helping your dog associate the crate with comfort, safety and positive things.

As your puppy becomes more and more comfortable with spending long times in the crate, give him or her a toy such as a stuffed Kong or a chew to work on. Before they can finish, take the toy away calmly. If your dog howls or barks for you to return it, leave them in the crate until they quiet down. Once calmed down, return the toy. This will show them you return when they are quiet and also rewards them for their good behavior.

Teach that it is OK to be Alone

Each day, allow some time for your puppy to be alone. Whether in a crate or in a quiet room by himself, this alone time will help your pet feel comfortable being alone. Even if you are retired, work from home or are a stay-at-home mom, this alone time for your pet is crucial to help them feel less stress once you do have to leave them alone.  They won’t fear quiet alone time, but instead expect it as a normal part of their day.

Stay Calm When Leaving

When you leave the house, don’t make a big fuss over your pet. The more excited energy you project onto your pet the more anxious they will feel once you leave the house. Over time, this pattern of excitement followed by you leaving can increase the anxiety levels in your pet and make it harder and harder for your dog to handle being alone.

Give Your Pet Plenty of Exercise

Burning off energy through playtime, walks or games is a great thing to do with your dog before you leave the house. Not only does this give you some great bonding time with your pet, but it also lowers their energy level while you are away.

Yes, working with your pet on separation issues may seem like a lot of work at first, but in the long run, your neighbors will thank you, your furniture and home will thank you and most importantly, your dog will thank you for taking them time to do this.


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call (937) 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Sep 25

Protect Pets from Everyday Risks in Home

You’ve heard of baby proofing your home, but how about pet proofing? Animals can be naturally curious and typically want to explore areas where they should not go in your home.

When pet proofing your home get down to your pet’s level. When you are on your hands and knees you will have a better view of your house from your pet’s perspective. You may find cords that you thought were tucked away but peek through behind a couch or an area where your vacuum can’t reach but your pet can.

With this in mind look around your house and take notes of areas that could be dangerous to your animal or that need to be changed to better protect them from harm. Here are just a few tips on how to protect your pets in some of the common areas within your house.

Living Room/Family Room

  • Put away any decorations on  your table that can easily be knocked over and broken by a curious cat
  • Cover all heating and air vents
  • Place dangling wires out of reach of your pets
  • Move houseplants out of reach so your animals don’t chew or digest something that can harm them
  • Pick up childrens’ toys and games so no small pieces or other objects are digested by your pet
  • Use special vented lids on candles to avoid your pet interacting with an open flame

Kitchen

  • Make sure trashcans are covered or in cabinets out of paws reach
  • Use childproof latches to stop any curious pet from opening cabinets
  • Keep all foods, even those not harmful, out of reach of your pets

Bathroom

  • Place medicines, cleaners and other chemicals in a secure cabinet away from pets
  • Keep toilet lid closed to prevent drowning or drinking harmful chemicals
  • Keep all small items such as hair ties, ribbons or other accessories in a closed container or drawer
  • Make sure items such as curling irons can cool down in a safe space away from your pet

Bedroom

  • Keep shoes and laundry secure behind closed doors so pets don’t eat buttons or strings
  • Move medications, lotions or cosmetics away from readily accessible areas such as a nightstand
  • Keep wires out of reach to avoid chewing or electrical burns

Garage

  • Move all chemicals to high shelves or place in closed cabinets
  • Clean all antifreeze from the floor and driveway because this is highly poisonous and can be lethal for your animals
  • Keep all sharp tools out of reach to avoid accidental cuts or lacerations

With just a few adjustments to your regular routines, you and your pets can feel safer and happier in your home.

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call (937) 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org