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Humane Society of Greater Dayton
Aug 22

Safely Take a Dip During the Dog Days of Summer

dog-in-poolWhat better way to cool off these dog days of summer than with a dip in the pool? On a hot day, your dog may agree that the pool is the best activity for both of you to stay refreshed. Whether you have a pooch who loves to dive right in or one that may be apprehensive about the water, with these four easy tips, you can ensure that man’s best friend will stay cool and safe this summer. 

Keep Your Eyes on Your Dog

Although your dog may seem fine in the water, in a matter of seconds something could go wrong and he or she may not be able to bark or alarm you to an emergency. Keep close to your pets and make sure that you are monitoring their activity in the water. Do not let your pet swim alone in the pool.

Take Baby Steps

Even a natural-born swimmer may be a bit hesitant near a pool for the first time. If you want to have your dog in the pool with you then start working with them slowly. Make sure to take them to a shallow area and remember to praise them continuously throughout your interaction in the water. With time, you dog will be hopping right in for some R&R in your pool. Remember, although this is a great exercise for you and your pet, your dog can easily get worn out. Just like with any other exercise, you need to start slow and work up your pet’s endurance in the water. They are using muscles they might not usually use and can easily get tired in the beginning.

Plan an Exit

Using a pool ladder can be a new and intimidating task for your dog. It is not a natural thing for them to use. You will need to take time to practice using the ladder with your pet. This will help them feel more comfortable in the pool and will also allow them to exit more safely.

Rinse and Dry Dog

After exiting from the pool, it is important to rinse off your dog with some fresh water. This will help wash the pool chemicals off your dog and will prevent any skin irritation to your pet. It is also important to dry your dog off, especially their ears. Too much moisture or dampness in your pet’s ears can lead to ear infections. Use a towel or place your hair dryer on the “cool” setting and gently dry your dog’s ears to help prevent any problems down the road.


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established “no-kill” animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937- 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Jul 25

Protect Yourself from a Dog Bite

Protecting people and pets is a top priority for the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. We don’t want to see anyone get hurt, especially when it comes to dog bites. To help lower your risk of a dog bite, you need to understand warning signs the dog may be giving you. When you first encounter a dog, whether you know it or not, you need to be polite and respect the personal space of the dog. Never rush up to an animal or startle them. Let them see you and become aware of you before you pet any animal. In addition, here are four things you need to know before interacting with any dog. 

Assess Their Body Language

If you are face to face with a dog who is illustrating to you that he may attack, the safest bet is to put as much space between you and the dog as possible. If the dog appears to have a tensed body, stiff tail, pulled back ears, flicking tongue, intense stare or is backing away then you need to be on high alert. Also, while putting the space between you and the dog, never turn your back on the animal. If they see you turn and run, their first instinct will be to chase and catch you.  

Evaluate Your Risk

If a dog is approaching you and it appears to be in attack mode there are certain things you should do to protect yourself. You must first and foremost resist the urge to run away screaming. Instead stay very still with your hands on your sides and avoid any direct eye contact with the dog. Once the dog loses interest in you, slowly begin to back away from the animal until you are completely out of his sight.

Protect Yourself if Bitten

If you have evaluated your risk and remained motionless, but the dog is still in attack mode then you want to put anything you can between you and the dog. Use things such as your purse, coat or other items in your hands and “feed” it to the dog so that it puts more distance between your body and the dog. If the dog knocks you to the ground, your safest bet is to curl into a ball with your hands over your ears and remain motionless. Although you may be scared, try not to scream or roll around because this will only keep the dog interested in you.

Taking Care of a Bite

If you are bitten by a dog try not to panic or scream. Once you are safe and the dog has moved on, immediately wash the wound thoroughly with warm water and soap. You will need to contact your doctor immediately to ensure you are safe and don’t require any additional medical attention. You should also report the dog bite to your local animal control agency. For residents in Montgomery County, this means you should contact the Animal Resource Center at (937) 898-4457.


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937-268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org.

Jul 11

Keep Your Hikes Safe and Fun

hikeThere is nothing better than spending a beautiful day out with your favorite pet enjoying all that nature has to offer. However, when you and your dog head outside to enjoy this weather and become explorers on a hiking trail there are a few safety tips you should keep in mind.

Be Mindful of the Leash

Naturally, dogs are explorers. If you hit the hiking trails with your pet you may want to keep them on a shorter leash. This will give you more control of your pet, especially if you are in a wooded or high-brush area. If you are in a wide-open space and feel comfortable having your pets go off-leash you need to make sure they respond to commands and don’t run too far from you. Remember to also be respectful of others. Not everyone loves dogs as much as you and they may be nervous or anxious if they see a dog off-leash. Always have your leash close by so you can put your dog on the leash at any given moment.

Stay Up-to-Date on Vaccinations

You never know what your pets will encounter on a hiking trail. From other dogs to wildlife, it is important to have your dogs up-to-date on all of their vaccinations before you venture into the great unknown. This will keep your dogs safe and protect them from any potentially harmful things around them.

Respect Your Surroundings

Even in the wild you should be respectful of your surroundings. Although it’s not the most luxurious part of owning a dog, cleaning up your dog’s waste is a necessity that all dog owners must do. This shouldn’t be ignored because you are in the wild. Use the same rules as a dog park and clean up after your pets so the trails can remain clean for others to enjoy. Make sure to keep a few baggies with you on all hikes.  

Stay Hydrated

Make sure that before you head out on the hiking trails you grab a bottle of water for you and for your pet. Keep an expandable bowl in your pocket for your dog to drink from. Don’t allow your pets to drink from puddles, streams or creeks. There may be bacteria in these areas that could harm your dog more than hydrate them.

Inspect Your Pup

After your hike is over, you want to do a quick once-over and check your dog for any ticks or other creepy-crawlies. Pay close attention to crevices or skin folds along with their stomach and ears. If you find anything on your dog, remove it immediately.


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call (937) 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

Jun 19

Make Your Cat Adoption Successful

IMG 7595By nature, cats are territorial creatures. When entering a new home, they may feel uneasy in their new surroundings. Plus, if you are introducing this new pet into your home with additional pets, there will be an added level of stress. To ensure that your cat adoption is successful, follow our simple tips for bringing a new cat into your home.

Be Prepared

If you know you want to adopt a cat, make sure you have all the supplies needed for your cat to feel at home before you adopt. This will include basics such as a cat carrier, litter box, litter, food and water bowls, cat food, toys, etc. If you already have a cat and are bringing another one into your home, make sure to have separate items for the new pet.

Cat Proof Your Home

From poisonous plants to exposed cords, there are many hazards that can be harmful to your new pet. Before you adopt, make sure you cat-proof your home. Get rid of hazardous plants, pack away fragile items that could easily be knocked over by a curious cat, haves screens in doors and windows so your cat can’t get out and hide cords that could be chewed on by your pet. 

Create a Safe Space

When you are introducing a new cat into your home, start small. If you just let the cat loose from the start, your home may seem a little too overwhelming for your furry friend. For the first few days, create a smaller space for your pet to live in such as a laundry room or spare bathroom. Make sure to furnish this room with what your cat will need such as a litter box, food, water and toys. As they become accustomed to this space, slowly begin to introduce other spaces to them.

Identify Your Cat

When adopting a cat it is important to make sure they are identified. Especially when they first arrive to a new home, they may be scared and wanting to run away. When a pet is adopted from the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, it is already microchipped. However, if your cat is not microchipped, you should stop in and get this quick procedure done. The whole process only takes a few minutes and no appointment is needed.

Introduce New Cats Slowly

If you already have a dog or cat, introduce your new cat to them slowly. Let them sniff noses, touch each other, but no full-body contact. When you are not home, you should continue to keep your pets isolated from each other. Once everyone is comfortable with this step, open up the isolation room to your pets. Don’t make a big deal out of it, but just let them happen upon each other. Watch from the sidelines to see how they interact. Your older pets may follow around the new ones, which is a typical territorial behavior. With time, hostilities will lessen and cats will start to get along. Just be patient and continue to work with them. If a full cat fight occurs, go back to step one and extend this process for a little longer. The slower your transition, the easier it will be for everyone involved.

 


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org

May 29

Be Considerate When Using Dog Parks

DogParkWith weather warming up and the sun shining longer, it is natural to want to be outside with your pets. More of us want to take our dogs to a dog park to enjoy the fresh air and exercise. However, if you are unfamiliar with dog parks, there are a few things you should know so you and your pet maintain proper dog park etiquette.

Stay Up-to-Date on Vaccinations

Make sure your dogs are all up-to-date on their vaccinations. While many dog parks require proof that the dog has their current vaccinations, some are not monitored as closely. Because of this, there may be dogs visiting the dog park that aren’t as up on all their vaccinations. If your dog interacts with another dog that isn’t up-to-date, he or she may be at risk for contracting an illness.

Be Aware of Size

Even if you have a smaller dog that is comfortable around larger dogs, size still matters and should be something you are aware of. If your dog park does not have a separate area for smaller dogs, make sure to keep your dog close to you and don’t allow any wrestling among your dog and larger breeds. Although they may not mean harm, a larger breed can hurt a smaller dog during play time unintentionally.

Keep Pets Hydrated

Yes, most dog parks do offer some source of water for the dogs playing in their area. However, with these community drinking locations you can run the risk of spreading illnesses between dogs. This is why it is safest to bring your own collapsible dog bowl with you. If they have a source of water available, simply fill up your bowl. However, if no clean unused water is available I also recommend you bring your own jug of water with you. 

Don’t Forget to Clean Up

OK, so none of us necessarily enjoy this step, but it is one of the biggest gripes we hear from dog park attendees. If your dog uses the restroom in the dog park, it is your responsibility to clean up any solid pieces your pet leaves behind. Many dog parks will have bags and waste bins available, but you should keep a few baggies with you in case none are available.

If you stick with us and follow these simple rules, you and your pet will have a safe and healthy time at the dog park. There are numerous dog parks in the area for you to try out including one right at our animal center at 1661 Nicholas Road in Dayton. Make it an adventure with your pet. Try out the different parks and have some fun as we all welcome in the warmer spring air!    


Do you have a question for Brian? E-mail him at AskBrian@hsdayton.org. Brian Weltge is the President and CEO of the Humane Society of Greater Dayton. The Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to building loving relationships between people and pets. Founded 113 years ago, it is the largest and most established no-kill animal welfare agency in the area. It focuses on pet adoptions, eliminating pet overpopulation, providing education and ensuring the humane treatment of animals. For more information about the Humane Society of Greater Dayton, call 937- 268-PETS (7387) or visit www.hsdayton.org